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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME

CH 101 Periodicity And Bonding
(Lecture: 15 hours, Credit(s): 1 )
OBJECTIVES
To cater a fundamental knowledge about structures, shapes and electron arrangements of atoms and molecules.

COURSE CONTENT
Properties of waves: Quantum theory and electronic structure of atoms, electromagnetic radiation, Plank’s quantum theory, photoelectric effect, Bohr’s theory, emission spectrum of hydrogen atom, the dual nature of electron, quantum mechanics: De Broglie’s principle, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, quantum numbers, atomic orbitals and their shapes, Pauli exclusion principle, electronic configuration of elements, electronic configuration of diatomic molecules, poly atomic molecules and their shapes, Lewis structure, VSEPR theory, molecular orbital theory, valance bond theory and hybridization, LCAO approximation, bond order, bond energy, bond strength, Born Haber cycle, ionization energy, lattice energy, solvation energy, hydrogen bond, metallic bond, concept of resonance, delocalization.

RECOMMENDED READING
1. D.A Mc Quarrie Donald. A, General chemistry, (1984), New York, W. H. Freeman & co.
2. Unokask Ronold A, Delorerzo Dubnque, General chemistry, (1993), W. M. L. Brown pbb.1.
3. P.W. Atkins, General chemistry, (1992), 2nd edition, Oxford University press.
4. OUSl, General chemistry & Inorganic chemistry Part I, (1983), The Open University of Sri Lanka.
5. H. H. Syster, C. A. vander werf & A. W. Darielson, General chemistry-A systematic approach, (1959), 2nd edition, New York the Macmillan co.


CH 102 Thermodynamics and Introduction to Electrochemistry
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide a basic knowledge on entropy changes, expansion of ideal gases and its application, feasibility of chemical reactions by using electrode potential of some standard electro chemical cells.

COURSE CONTENT

Thermodynamics
Thermodynamic description of systems, thermodynamic functions, laws of thermodynamics (zeroth, first and second law), work and heat, reversible and irreversible expansion, comparison of reversible and irreversible work done in adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas, application of first law of thermodynamics, expression for internal energy and heat capacities Cp and Cv entropy changes, thermodynamic equation of state, thermodynamic functions, Maxwell’s thermodynamic relationships, Clausius-Clapayron equation.

Introduction to Electrochemistry
Review of redox reaction, Electro chemical cells, Electrodes, Cell diagram, Electrode potential and Standard electrode potential, Electrochemical series, Predicting feasibility of chemical reaction, The nernst equation.

RECOMMENDED READING
1. Mark, Melvin, Thermodynamics: Principles & Application, (1979), Boston.
2. Simonson, John, Thermodynamics, (1993), London Macmillan press Ltd.
3. Holman, Jack, Phillips, Thermodynamics, (1980), 3rd edition, New York, Mcgrow-Hill Co.


CH 151 Inorganic practical (Quantitative and qualitative analysis)
(Practical: 60 hours, 2credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a basic training on titration and a training on identification of anions and cations (qualitative analysis) in inorganic mixtures and to give a sound understanding of the theory behind the quantitative and qualitative analysis.
COURSE CONTENT
Quantitative Inorganic Analysis
Acid-base, precipitation and redox titration: standardization of hydrochloric acid using standard sodium carbonate, standardization of NaOH using standard HCl, determination of the percentage of CO32- and OH- ions, standardization of HCl using standard borax, standardization of NaOH using standard borax, standardization of potassium permanganate using oxalic acid, standardization of ferrous ion solution with standard potassium chromate, standardization of Na2S2O3 using standard potassium dichromate, determination of the percentage of Cu2+ in a given salt using standard Na2S2O3 solution.
Qualitative Inorganic Analysis
Test for known anions: carbonate, sulphite, thiosulphate, chloride, bromide, iodide, sulphate, arsenate, arsenite, phosphate, nitrate, chromate, dichromate and sulphide, test for unknown anion mixture and identification of cations.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Vogel, Qualitative inorganic analysis, (1994), 6th edition, Orient longman Ltd.
2. Browning & Joseph, Practical chemistry, (1957), 13th edition, The Colombo apothecaries’ co. Ltd.
3. OUSL, Sarath D Perera, Basic principals of Chemistry Part V, (1995), The Open University of Sri Lanka.
4. Schenk G. H, Hahn R. B. Hartkopf A. V, Introduction to Analytical Chemistry, (1981), 2nd edition, Aclyn & Bacon, INC.
5. Skoog D. A, West D. M, Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry, (1982), 4th edition, CBS College publication.

CH 103 Stereochemistry and Kinetic Molecular Theory
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a short introduction to the conceptual basis of stereochemistry, naming and representation of molecules and the behavior of real gases particularly the distribution of velocities of gas molecules and kinetic study of molecules. .
COURSE CONTENT
Shapes of organic molecules: stereochemistry, constitution and configuration, isomerism: types of isomerism and nomenclature of isomers: position, functional group, configurational and geometrical isomers, Newman projection, Sawhorse representation, chirality and optical activity, symmetry elements, Fischer projection formula, optical isomers: diastereo isomers and enantiomers, recemic modification and separation of two enantiomers, conversion of enantiomers into diastereo isomers, separation of recemic mixture, conversion of one enantiomer into recemic mixture, nomenclature of optical active compounds, erythro/threo ad R/S System of nomenclature, E/Z nomenclature

Assumptions of kinetic molecular theory, derivation of kinetic gas equation, distribution of molecular velocities, behaviour of real gases: effect of pressure variation, effect of temperature variation, deviation of Vander-Waals equation: volume correction, pressure correction.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Kalsi P. S, Stereochemistry conformation and mechanism, 3rd edition, New age international publishers.
2. Nasiplui D, Stereochemistry of organic compounds, Wiley Eastern limited, New Delhi.
3. Kurt mislow, introduction to stereochemistry, The Benjamin/cummings publishing company, NC.


CH 104 Reaction mechanisms and Chemical Kinetics
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide a better understanding of the chemical reaction and mechanisms in organic chemistry and kinetic study of chemical reactions.
COURSE CONTENT
Reaction intermediates in organic chemistry: carbonium ion, carbanion, carbon free radical, stability and reactivity of these intermediates and their formation, substitution reaction: unimolecular necleophilic substitution reaction, bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction, electrophilic substitution reaction, elemination reaction, addition reaction, rearrangement reaction, neighbouring group participation, internal necleophilic substitution reaction, acidity of simple aliphatic acids, basicity of ions.
Theories of reaction rates: collision theory, transition state theory, reaction rate, order of a reaction, differential rate equation for zero, first and second order reaction, molecularity of a reaction, unimolecular, bimolecular, trimolecular reaction, determination of the order of the reaction, effect of temperature on reaction rate: Arrhenius equation, complex reaction, reversible reaction, consecutive reaction, chain reaction, kinetics of chain reaction.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Morrison and Boid, Organic chemistry, (1980), 3rd edition, United states of America.
2. B. S. Bahl, Arun Bahl, Text book of organic chemistry, (1994), New Delhi, S. Chand & company Ltd.


CH 152 Organic Practical (Elemental identification and functional group analysis)
(30 hrs. 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a training on elemental identification and functional group analysis of organic compounds.
COURSE CONTENT
Preliminary investigation, detection of element present (flame test, beilstein test for halogens, test for N, X, P and S), characterization of the groups (such as aliphatic alcohol, aldehyde, ketone, ester, phenol, alkene, amine, ammonium salt and amide and aromatic nitro compound).
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Arthur Vogel, A textbook of practical organic chemistry, (1956), 3rd edition, English language book society & longman group limited, London.
2. Raj K. Bansal, Laboratory manual of Organic chemistry, (1994), 2nd edition, Willey Eastern Limited India.
3. B. S. Bahl, Arun Bahl, Elementary organic chemistry, (1993), New-Delhi.
4. Mann F. G, Saunders B.C, Practical organic chemistry, (1960), 4th edition, Orient longman limited.
5. Norman R. O. C & Waddington D.J. Modern organic chemistry, (1983), 4th edition, English language book society, Bell& Hyman.
6. Royston M Roberts.et.al, An introduction to modern experimental organic chemistry, (1969), Holt, Rinchart & Winston,INC.

CH 201 Co-ordination Chemistry and Main Group Chemistry
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide a thorough knowledge in chemical and physical properties of the elements and structural studies of the co-ordination complexes.
COURSE CONTENT
Co-ordination Chemistry:
Introduction, representation of co-ordination compounds, co-ordination numbers, classification of ligands, nomenclature of co-ordination compounds, stereochemistry and isomerism of coordination compounds, bonding and stability of co-ordination complexes, explanation by: valence bond theory, crystal field theory, molecular orbital theory (octahedral, tetrahedral and square planar molecules) and ligand field theory, Jahn-Teller effect, magnetic properties of transition metal complexes.
Main Group Chemistry
Physical and chemical characteristics of group I to group VII elements.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. F. Albert cotton and Geoffrey Wilkinson, Advanced Inorganic chemistry, (1930), 3rdedition, Index science publishes, a division of John Wiley & sons.
2. P. L. Sony, Text book of inorganic chemistry (modern approach), (1980), New Delhi, Sultan Chand & sons.
3. James E. Huheey, Inorganic chemistry Principles of structure and reactivity, (1972), 1st edition, Harper and Row publisher.
4. J. D. Lee, A new concise inorganic chemistry, (1984), 3rd edition, London van Nostrand Reinhold Co. Ltd.


CH 202 Analytical Chemistry
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a sound knowledge on the change of some chemical analysis & the fundamentals of some selected analytical methods & instruments.
COURSE CONTENT
Solvent extraction, principles and types used, application, chromatography: partition and adsorption chromatography: paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, column chromatography, gas chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, colorimetry, spectrophotometry, atomic absorption spectrometry and flame photometry.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Dick J.G., Analytical chemistry, Mc Grow-Hill Kogakusha Ltd.
2. Skoog A, West, Holler, Fundamentals of analytical chemistry, Saunders collage publishing.
3. Khopkar S.M. Basic concepts of analytical chemistry, Wiley eastern Limited.
4. OUSL, Analytical chemistry part IV, Separation methods.


CH 203 Spectroscopic Methods (Application of physical methods inorganic chemistry)
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a thorough knowledge in structural features / elucidation of organic compounds by using physical methods such as spectroscopic methods.
COURSE CONTENT
Basic theory and instrumentation, different types of transitions,
UV spectroscopy: interpretation of spectra, calculation of lmax and �max values of conjugated olefins and conjugated carbonyl compounds.
IR spectroscopy: skeletal and characteristic group vibrations, different types of stretching and bending vibrations and frequencies of vibrations.
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR- HNMR CNMR): magnetic properties of nuclei: nuclear spin, spin quantum numbers, nuclear energy levels, anisotropic effect or anisotropy of chemical bond or ring current effect, basic theory of instrumentation, chemical shifts, spin-spin coupling (n+1) rule, basic theory, coupling constant (J), factors affecting J, interpretation of 1H-NMR and simple application of 1H-NMR spectroscopy.
Mass spectrometry: basic theory, instrumentation, electron ionization, molecular ion, molecular weight determination, base peak, fragmentation, a and b cleavage, McLafferty rearrangement, interpretation of mass spectra of simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. William. Dudley. H and Ian Flaming, Spectroscopic methods in Organic chemistry, (1980), 3rd edition, London McGrowHill Book co Ltd.
2. D. L. Pavia, G.M.Lampman, G.S.Kriz, Introduction to spectroscopy, Philadelphia students college publishers.
3. Walker. S & H. Straw, Spectroscopy, volume 2, (1967), Science paperbacks.
4. MAL. Leopold, Spectroscopic tricks volume 2, (1971), Newyorke Plimium press.


CH 251 Analytical Chemistry Practical
(Practical: 60 hours, 2 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide training on iodometric titration, iodimetric and analytical applications of titrimetric methods.
COURSE CONTENT
Inorganic analytical chemistry: standardization of hydrochloric acid using KIO3, standardization of iodide using KIO3, standardization of Na2CO3 using KIO3, determination of strength of arsenic using standard KIO3 solution, determination of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets, determination of dissolved oxygen by Winkler method, determination of total hardness and calcium hardness of water, determination of nitrogen content of fertilizer, determination of iodine and iodide in an aqueous solution, determination of salicylic acid (ASA) in aspirin tablets, determination of magnesium hydroxide in milk of magnesia, determination of total capacity of an ion exchange resin.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Dick J. G, Analytical chemistry, (1973), International student edition, Tokyo.
2. Jeflery G. H and Bassert. J, Vogel’s textbook of Quantitative chemical analysis, (1939), ELBS and Longman, London.
3. OUSL, Analytical chemistry practical, (1988), Open University, Sri Lanka.
4. Skoog A and West. M. Fundamental of Analytical Chemistry, (1982), 4th Edition, CBS College, America.
5. Srivastava A. K and Jain P, Chemical analysis: An instrumental approach, (1997), New Delhi S. Chand & Co. Ltd.

CH 204 Reaction mechanism and Aromaticity
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 Credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a fundamental knowledge on the chemistry and reaction of carbonyl compounds, stabilization of organic compounds in terms of delocalization of electrons, synthesis and reactions of some selected cyclic hydrocarbons.
COURSE CONTENT
Chemistry of carbonyl compounds: nucleophilic addition and elimination of carbonyl groups, perkin reaction, knoevenagel rearrangement, wittig reaction, Wolf-Kishner reduction, benzoin condensation, Claisen condensation, Dieckmann cyclization, Trope reaction, Michael addition, chemistry of condensed or fused rings: synthesis of naphthalene, reaction of naphthalene, preparation of anthracene, aromaticity: Huckel rule and Aromatic character, non benzenoid and poly nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. OUSL, Organic chemistry: Aromatic compounds of reaction mechanisms, part-3, The Open University of Sri Lanka.
2. Bahl B. S, Arun Bahl, A text-Book of organic chemistry, (1994), S. Chand and company ltd.
3. Stanley H. Pine, Organic chemistry, 5th edition, Mc Grown-Hill book company.


*CH 205 Boron Chemistry & Silicates
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide a fundamental knowledge on the properties of bonding in boron compounds and structural studies, usages and reactions of silicon compounds.
COURSE CONTENT
Electron deficient compounds, electronic structure and bonding in boron compounds, structure and bonding in boranes (boron hydrides), structure of polyhedral boranes, Wade’s rule, predicting the structures using Wade’s rule, ‘styx’ number for neutral boranes, topology of boranes, preparation and reactions of boranes, carboranes, silicates, simple othosilicates, non-cyclic silicates, cyclic silicates anions, infinite chain anions.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Lee J. D, Concise inorganic chemistry, 5th edition, backwell science limited.
2. Keith F. Piucell, John C. Kotz , Inorganic Chemistry, W. B. Saunders company.
3. Emelens H. J, Sharp A. G, Modern aspects of Inorganic Chemistry, Universal Book stall.


CH 206 X-ray crystallography, Symmetry & symmetry elements and Phase rule
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To deliver a basic knowledge on the phase diagram for two or three component system, some related definitions and three-dimensional structural studies of crystals.
COURSE CONTENT
Symmetry operation, symmetry elements, crystalline state, crystal systems, diffraction techniques and their application, determination of cell dimensions, ASTM cards.
Definitions of phase, components and degrees of freedom, phase rule.
Two component system: vapour pressure diagrams, temperature- composition system, liquid-liquid phase diagrams, liquid-solid phase diagrams.
Three component system: triangular phase diagrams, partially miscible liquids, the role of added salt.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Bajpai D. N, Advanced physical chemistry, (1992), S. Chand & company Ltd.
2. Bahl B. S. Tuli G.D, Arun Bhal, Essential of physical chemistry, (1994), S.chand & company Ltd.
3. Atkins P.W, Physical chemistry, (1982), Oxford University press.


CH 253 Organic Chemistry Practicals
(30 hrs. 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give training on preparation, separation and identification of some organic compounds and to give a sound understanding in the principles of reaction mechanism, recrystallization techniques and spectroscopic properties of some selected organic compounds.
COURSE CONTENT
Separation of base and neutral compound, separation of acid and neutral compound, preparation of acetamide, hydrolysis of ester, synthesis of aspirin, preparation of oxime, interpretation of UV, IR, NMR and mass spectral problems.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Furniss B. S. and Hannatord A. J, Textbook of practical organic chemistry, (1948), ELBS, America.
2. Clerk F. and Most J. R, Experimental organic chemistry. (1976), John Wiley and Sons., New York.
3. Harwood L. M. and Moody C. J, Experimental Organic chemistry, (1989), Black-well, London.
4. Silverstein R. M, Spectrometric identification of organic chemistry, (1961), John wiley and sons., America.
5. Peter sykes, Mechanism in organic chemistry, (1961), Longman Inc., New York.


*CH 254 Physical Chemistry Practicals
(30 hrs. 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a basic training on the applications of physical chemistry through basic experiments, handling of some instruments.
COURSE CONTENT
Determination of partition co-efficient of I2 between CCl4 and water, determination of the activation energy of reaction, determination of stoichoiometry by temperature method, Separation of a mixture of compounds and determination of Rf values by a paper chromatographic method, construction of the phase diagram of napthaline and biphenyl system, determination of the solubility product of a sparingly soluble salt, reaction of thiosulphate ion and hydrochloric acid, determination of the order, molecularity and rate constant of the reaction, determination of extinction co-efficient by colorimetric method.
RECOMMEND READING
1. Liptrot G. F, Thompson J. J and Walker, G. R, Modern physical chemistry, (1982), Harper Collins publishers, London.
2. Chemistry course team for the board of study in Management, Science and Technology, Physical chemistry parts-1& 11, (1984), The Open University of Sri Lanka.
3.Wood C. W and Holliday A. K, Physical chemistry, (1967), Butterworth & Co. Ltd., London.
4. Bahl, B. S, Tuli G. D and Arun bahl, Essentials of physical chemistry, (1943), S. Chand & Company Ltd.
5.Atkins P. W, Physical chemistry, (1978), Oxford University press, Great Britain.

CH 301 Chemistry of Natural Products
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a basic understanding of synthetic organic chemistry, the chemistry of naturally occurring compounds such as carbohydrates, amino acids and peptides.
COURSE CONTENT
Primary and secondary metabolites, bio-synthesis of natural products, bio-synthetic pathways: poly ketide and Shikimic acid pathways, basic structures of terpenoids, steroids and alkaloids, basic chemistry of carbohydrates, amino acids, and peptides.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. I. L. Finar, Stereo chemistry and Chemistry of natural product, Volume 2, (1991), 5thedition, London ELRS. Longman company Ltd.
2. George H. Schmid, Organic chemistry, (1995), University of Toronto.
3. J.Mann, R.S.Davidson, J.B. Hobbs, D.V. Bantthorp, and J.B.Harbrone, Natural products: Their Chemistry and Biological significance, (1994), Addison wesley longman Ltd. England.
4. OUSL, Organic chemistry part III, The Open University of Sri Lanka.


CH 302 Heterocyclic chemistry and Rearrangement reactions
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give enough knowledge in synthesis of cyclic compounds containin elementsHeterocyclic compounds and mechanism involved in the reactions.
COURSE CONTENT
Heterocyclic Chemistry
Five membered hetrocyclic compounds: furan, thiophene, pyrrole, indole.
Six membered hetrocyclic compounds: pyridine, quinolene, isoquinolene.
Rearrangement Reactions
Rearrangements involving carbonium ion, carbanion , carbon free radical,,carbenes and nitrenes, nucleophilic rearrangement reaction: Wagner-meerwein , pinacol-pinacolone, dienone- phenol, beckman, Baeyer-villiger, Hoffman, curtius, Lossen, Schimidt, Stevens rearrangement, rearrangement involving migration of double bonds (cope rearrangement), other rearrangements (benzidine rearrangement, benzillic acid rearrangement, Favoski rearrangement, Barton rearrangement, cyclo addition and related reactions.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. I. L. Finar, Stereochemistry and Chemistry of natural product, (1991), 5th edition, Volume 2, London. ELRS, Longman co. Ltd.
2. George H. Schmid, Organic chemistry, (1995), University of Toronto.
3. J. Mann, R. S. Davidson, J. B. Hobbs, D. V. Bantthorp and J. B.Harbrone, Natural products: Their chemistry and Biological significance, (1994), Addison wesley longman Ltd. England.
4. OUSL, Organic chemistry part III, The Open University Sri Lanka.


CH 303 Electrochemistry
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a better understanding of the properties of electrolytes and electrodes.
COURSE CONTENT
Faraday’s law, properties of electrolytes, classification of electrolytes, ion activity, Debye-Huckel theory, electrode potential and thermodynamic function, limiting of Debye-Huckel model, application of Debye-Huckel equation (determination of thermodynamic equilibrium constant), electrolytic conduction, molar conductivity, variation of molar conductivity with concentration, Kohlrausch’s law of independent migration of ions. Arrhenius ionization theory, determination of molar conductivity at infinite dilution, Debye-Huckel Onsager theory, mobility of transport number, determination of transport number by Hittrof’s method and by moving boundary method, conductimetric titrations, chemical and electrochemical reactions, types of cells, emf and electrode potentials, diagram of standard cadmium cell, classification of electrodes, application of emf measurements (determination of activity coefficient, determination of transport number, determination of ionic product of water, determination of dissociation constant of weak acid, determination of thermodynamic properties of electrochemical reactions and determination of equilibrium constant), electrical energy sources (primary cell, secondary cell, fuel cell).
RECOMMENDED READING
1. BRETT, Cristopher M. A, Electrochemistry: Principles methods and Applications, (1993), Oxford University Press.
2. Atkins. P. W, Physical Chemistry, (1998), 6th edition, Oxford University Press.
3. Mete. Elyde, Physical chemistry, (1979), 4th edition, New York mcgrohill co.


CH 351 Organic practical
(Practical: 60 hours, 2 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give training on techniques involved in synthetic organic chemistry and to give knowledge on the theory of reaction mechanism and rearrangement reactions.
COURSE CONTENT
Organic chemistry practicals: nitrogen of bromo benzene, preparation of phenyl urea, preparation of 5,5 diphenyl hydentoin, preparation of benzil, preparation of benzilic acid, preparation of phenyl benzoate, separation of organic mixture (Ie. acid, base and neutral compound) by chemically active solvents, preparation of benzanilide, preparation of dibenzylidene from anilene to tribromoanilene, hydrolysis of methyl salicylate, preparation of acetyl salicylic acid from salicylic acid.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Furniss B. S and Hannatord A. J, Textbook of practical organic chemistry, (1948). ELBS, America.
2. Clerk F and Most J. R, Experimental organic chemistry, (1976), John Wiley and Sons., New York.
3. Harwood L. M and Moody C. J, Experimental Organic chemistry, (1989), Black-well, London.
4. Mann F. G, Saunders B. C, Practical organic chemistry, (1960), 4thedition, Orient longman limited.
5. Peter Sykes, Mechanism in organic chemistry, (1961), Longman Inc., New York.
6. Eaton D. C, The world of organic chemistry, (1979), John wiley and Sons, New York.

CH 304 Quantum Chemistry, Industrial Chemistry and Metallurgy
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide a basic knowledge on particle and wave nature of radiation and its energy.
COURSE CONTENT
Blackbody radiation and energy quantization, photoelectric effect and photons, Bohr theory of hydrogen atom, De Broglie hypothesis, uncertainty principle, quantum mechanics, time independent Schrodinger equation, particle in a one-dimensional box, particle in a three dimensional box, degeneracy, operators
Concentration, extraction and purification of ores, Ellingham diagram and principles of reduction of metal ore, cement production (wet and dry process), chemical analysis of cement, hydration of Portland cement, Glass, glass forming process, special glasses, ceramics and ceramic fabrication.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Prasad K. R, Quantum chemistry, (1993), New Delhi: Wiley Eastern Ltd.
2. Matthews, Philip S. C, Quantum Chemistry of atoms and molecules, Cambridge University Press.
3. Davydobv A. S, Quantum mechanics, (1965), 2nd edition, Oxford Pergamon Press.
4. Greiner Walter, Quantum mechanics, (1981), London: Springer-verlag.
5. Agarwal B. K, Quantum mechanics, (1997), New Delhi, Prentice-Hall of India.


CH 305 Organometallic Chemistry & Non-aqueous solvents
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To provide a vast knowledge of compounds having carbon and transition metals, physical and chemical characteristics of solvents other than water.
COURSE CONTENT
Chemistry of metal carbonyls, introduction to organometallic chemistry, importance of organometallic oompounds, different structural types and bonding of organometallic compounds, different structural types of organic ligands, monohapto, polyhapto, bonding in metal carbonyls, effective atomic number rule, preparation of metal carbonyls, reactions of metal carbonyls, cyanides ,isocyanides, thiocyanates and isothiocyanates, structure bonding and properties of organometallic compounds of transition elements.
Introduction to non-aqueous solvents, classification of ion aqueous solvents, properties of solvents and their acid base strength, leveling action, solvolysis, effect of solvent on selected type of reactions, physical and chemical properties of non-aqueous solvents, uses of non-aqueous solvents.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. G. E. Coates, M. L. H. Green, P. POWELL, K.WADE, Principles of Organometallic Chemistry, (1965), 1st edition, Methuen & Co limited.
2. Bochmann Manfrer, Organometalic Chemistry, (1994), oxford University press.
3. Aylett B. J, Organometallic Compounds, (1979), 4th edition, London, Chapmane & Hall.
4. DR. W. A. Amarasini, Inorganic chemistry Part III, level IV, PSU 2113, (1986), The Open University of Sri Lanka.


CH 306 Surface Chemistry and Molecular Spectroscopy
(Lecture: 15 hours, 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a fundamental knowledge on chemical and physical changes that occurs on a solid surface, applications of adsorption and vibrational and rotational spectra of molecules.
COURSE CONTENT
Characteristics of physical and chemical adsorption, description of various interfaces, theories of adsorption: experimental determination of adsorption, Langmuir adsorption isotherm, Freundlisch adsorption isotherm and Brunaner Emmett and Teller adsorption isotherm (BET). application of adsorption isotherm, measurement of surface and interfacial tension, physical properties of surfactants, thermodynamics of adsorption.
Molecular properties: dipole moment, polarizability and magnetic property, rotational spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, vibration-rotation spectra, Raman spectroscopy.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Atkins. P. W, Physical Chemistry, (1998), 6th edition, Oxford University Press.
2. Mete. Elyde, Physical chemistry, (1979), 4th edition, New York mcgrohill co.
3. Moore, Walter J, Physical chemistry, (1972), 5th edition, London Orient Longman.
4. Mee A. J, Physical chemistry, (1960), 5th edition, London heinmann.
5. Noggle, Josefh H, Physical chemistry, (1985), Boston; Little Brown & co.


C H 353 Physical chemistry practical
(30 hrs. 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give training on the applications of physical chemistry through reaction kinetics, electrochemistry, phase rule and spectroscopic methods.
COURSE CONTENT
Determination of rate constant, order of the reaction with respect to methyl acetate and activation energy for the reaction, determination of the velocity constant of the inversion of sucrose by hydrochloric acid at room temperature, determination of adsorption isotherm of acetic acid from aqueous solution by charcoal, spectrophotometric determination of the pka value of an indicator (the dissociation constant of methyl red), determination of the order of the reaction with respect to iodine and acetone, determination of dissociation constant for weak acid by potentiometric titration, to obtain the phase diagram of water–acetic acid-chloroform system, determination of the end point of
a) strong acid (HCl) vs strong base (NaOH),
b) weak base (NH4OH) vs weak acid (CH3COOH),
b) precipitation reaction (CuSO4 vs NaOH ) using conductometric titration and the determination of the equilibrium constant of the reaction.
RECOMMENDED READING
1. Liptrot G. F, Thompson J. J and Walker G. R, Modern physical chemistry, (1982), Harper Collins publishers, London.
2. Chemistry course team for the board of study in Management, Science and Technology, Physical chemistry parts-1& 11, (1984), The Open University of Sri Lanka.
3.Wood C. W and Holliday A. K, Physical chemistry, (1967), Butterworth & Co. Ltd., London.
4. Bahl B. S, Tuli G. D and Arun bahl, Essentials of physical chemistry, (1943), S. Chand & Company Ltd.
5.Atkins P. W, Physical chemistry, (1978), Oxford University press, Great Britain.


*C H 354 Inorganic Chemistry Practical
(30 hrs. 1 credit unit)
OBJECTIVES
To give a training on gravimetric analysis and to give a sound knowledge on the theory behind the gravimetric analysis
COURSE CONTENT
Determination of sulphate as barium sulphate, determination of manganese as manganese ammonium phosphate, determination of calcium as calcium oxalate, determination of nickel(II) sulphate and determination of nickel, determination of aluminium as the 8-hytroxiyquinolate with precipitation from homogeneous solution, determination of chromium as lead chromate.
RECOMMENDED REFERENCE
1.Dick J. G, Analytical chemistry, (1973), International student edition. Tokyo.
2. Jeflery G. H and Bassert J, Vogel’s Textbook of Quantitative Chemical Analysis, (1939), ELBS and Longman, London.
3. Skoog A and West M, Fundamental of Analytical Chemistry, (1982), 4th Edition, CBS College, America.
4. Schenk H. & Hahn B, Introduction to analytical chemistry, (1977), Allyn & Bacon, America.

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